Hardiesmill
Hardiesmill

We are located at:


Hardiesmill Place

Gordon

Scottish Borders

TD3 6LQ

 

Beef Butchery

Open Monday-Fridays 8.30 am until about 4.00 pm.  If you are looking for a special piece of beef, please do give us a ring before coming, and making sure that we have it. 

Tel - 01573 410797

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How to cook a Roast

Requirements.

Roast, Roasting pan, meat thermometer (optional), red wine (optional), serving spoon, carving knife and fork.

 

Quantities.

As a very rough guide, allow 6-8 Oz (174g-250g) of off-the-bone raw beef per person. A 4.5kg roast on-the-bone should do 8-10 people.

 

Choosing your cut.

Broadly speaking there are three types of roast: on-the-bone, off-the-bone and pot-roasters,   The first two are roasted, the third is effectively boiled in a covered pan in the oven. Roasting looks smarter, is a bit quicker but has little tolerance for error, whilst pot roasting is forgiving, flavoursome and tender, but not as aesethically pleasing.

 

A. Off-the bone   

Fillet, Rump roasts, topside, Salmon cut, false fillet can be great, great roasts if you know what to look for (see our "what to look for when buying beef" page) and cook them very slightly slower. They are solid pieces of meat that have often been tied  to hold extra fat on (adds flavour) and/or to improve their appearance. They're easy to carve and quite quick to cook (1 hour for a roast for 6 people) but can turn dry and tough very quickly if either over-done or insufficiently marbled.

 

B. On-the-bone 

Sirloin Undercut, Sirloin roasts and Rib roasts are there for the look as well as the taste - no wonder the loin was knighted by George III(?) (hence Sir Loin). They're magnificent, there's no question about it, but they're also harder to carve so practice first.  The bones keep the moisture and add to the flavour to give you a truely fantastic eating experience, particularly if it's off a slow-grown beast. You have to be very skilled to get the Sirloin Undercut right as the fillet cooks faster than the sirloin, the other two are simpler.   The sirloin has a smaller eye but more meat proportionally, whilst the rib roast is bigger but carries more fat (hover over each of the names above for more details).  To carve, place the arched bone on the plate then cut down the back of the flat bone beore cutting across the grain.  

  

C.  Pot-roasts

Silverside, Brisket, even topside and false fillet can all be pot roasted if you're worried about timings. You can't have it rare or medium this way, but you'll get a lavely flavour and a beautiful flakey texture.  The Brisket has the bggest flavour but it's a flat piece of meat that's been rolled, so it does tend to fall apart once carved. Silverside is a good compromise if this matters. There are thousands of recipes out there, but if you're really stuck, shove in a pot with half a bottle of red wine, some challotes and a bit of seasoning, cover with a lid and place in the oven at 180 deg C for 2 hours-plus.

 

 

Cooking Instructions

 

A. Off-the Bone Roasts.

  • Remove all packaging and ideally bring up to room temperature whilst preheating the oven to 150 deg C .  If this isn't possible, allow to breath for a minimum of 10 minutes after removing any vacuum-packaging.
  • Leave any fat on, it'll keep the roast moist and improve the flavour.  The more advanced chef may wish to untie the roast, which can improve the flavour, but be ready to a bit more of a battle when carving.
  • Place on an open roasting tray and drizzle with a little red wine if you wish to have a rich gravy, or a little water if that doesn't appeal.
  • Place in centre of oven and cook for 50 mins/kg for rare, basting (spooning the juices over the roast) half way through and again at the end.
  • Remove from oven and allow to rest on a warm surface for 10-15 minutes.
  • Allow approx 5 mins/kg extra for medium-rare, 10 for medium etc. Remember the ends are usually well done even if the centre is rare.

 

Meat thermometers give the best guide.

Blue -  58 Deg C  core temp.

Rare -  60 Deg C  core temp.

Medium  -  65 Deg C  core temp.

Well done -  75 Deg C  core temp.

 

B. On-the-bone 

  • Ideally bring up to room temperature, which can take a couple of days if frozen. Remove packaging  and pre-heat oven to 190 deg C.
  • Place roast on roasting dish and drizzle with a little red wine or water. Put in oven and cook for 45mins/kg (20 mins per lb) +  20 mins for rare.
  • Baste (spoon the juices over the roast) half way through and again at the end.
  • Remove from oven and allow to rest on a warm surface for 10-15 minutes. Allow approx 5 mins/kg extra for medium-rare, 10 for medium etc. Remember the ends are usually well done even if the centre is rare.

 

Meat thermometers give the best guide.

Blue -  58 Deg C  core temp.

Rare -  60 Deg C  core temp.

Medium  -  65 Deg C  core temp.

Well done -  75 Deg C  core temp.

N.B. The bone will retain it's heat, so the core temperature will continue to clime ~3 deg C after removal from the oven.

 

To carve, place the arched bone on the plate then cut down the back of the flat bone beore cutting across the grain.  

 

C.  Pot-roasts

There are thousands of recipes out there, but if you're really stuck, shove in a pot with half a bottle of red wine, some shallots and a bit of seasoning, cover with a lid and place in the oven at 180 deg C for 3 hours!

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